Guided Backcountry Snowshoe Hikes

Directions to Walkinng Mountains Science Center

Overview

Tuesdays & Thursdays
9am-1pm
$50/person

Join an instructor trained as a Certified Interpretive Guide on these leisurely half-day guided snowshoe outings in the White River National Forest. Snowshoes are provided, but guests must bring their own sense of wonder and enthusiasm for spending time in the winter environment! We will hike and discuss the ecology of natural systems while spending time amongst snowcapped peaks and silent winter forests.

Looking for a more introductory snowshoe experience? Click here to learn about our FREE one-hour snowshoes.

Have a wedding, birthday party, or corporate event this winter? Contact Nathan Boyer-Rechlin at nathanbr@walkingmountains.org to schedule a private guided snowshoe excursion!

Please note: This program will take place on one of the eight trails described below. Hikes are not scheduled for specific trails ahead of time. This allows your snowshoe guide flexibility in choosing the trail with the best conditions that day. If you have a preference for one of the trails described below, email Nathan Boyer-Rechlin at nathanbr@walkingmountains.org with what date you plan on attending and which trail you are interested in exploring. We will make every attempt to accommodate requests but are limited by permit days and trail conditions!

Join us in our very own backyard for an exciting trip up the hills overlooking Avon and Walking Mountain Science Center campus. Departing from Buck Creek Road, just above Walking Mountains’ campus, this trail crosses over Buck Creek a few times as it winds up to a junction with Red and White Road. At the end of your trek will be rewarded with a unique vantage point of the valley!

A very popular trail out of the Edwards area, the Lake Creek drainage provides great views of New York Mountain and historic abandoned mines. Beavers are especially busy in the area and have caused many parts of the drainage to become swampy and abundant with Douglas Fir and other wildlife. The full trail is over 12 miles long, so we’ll snowshoe until we’re tired and then turn around!

The Iron Mountain 4×4 road passes through a popular bouldering area, known to locals as Fragglerock, and takes snowshoers up to the historic Redcliff cemetery. From the Redcliff overlook the trail climbs Iron Mountain, named for the ore once extracted from the area, and summits the hill for spectacular panoramas. This is a moderate to difficult trek but views of the sleepy and secluded town of Redcliff make it worthwhile!

Home to the Vail Ski and Snowboard Academy, Maloit Park and the adjoining Forest Service trails make for an excellent and easy day of snowshoeing. Trails wind through the area and we regularly see the next generation of Olympic hopefuls skating by on Nordic skis.

The trail climbs steadily as it follows an old road through aspen and then lodgepole. The trail passes the remains of several old cabins and offers good views of Cross Creek Valley and Mount of the Holy Cross. This is a moderate trail that is regarded as a local gem, off the beaten path in sleepy Minturn!

A recreational hotspot that is also home to the United States Forest Service Minturn Ranger Station, the Meadow Mountain trail winds its way from the valley bottom, once a lucrative lettuce farm, up to an aspen forest. A popular and easy trail, this snowshoeing location is perfect for those looking to learn more about the history of the area while enjoying views of the backside of Vail mountain.

The Squaw Creek trail begins at Squaw Creek Road in Edwards and ends at Salt Creek Trail #1878. The trail starts with a steep climb through aspen groves but becomes more gradual as you pass ranch property below. The trail follows an old road up the Squaw Creek drainage before turning back into singletrack, crossing several meadows

Discover a brand new trail system on Walking Mountains’ newest property along the Colorado River. The Sweetwater property has the “high desert” feel with abundant sage, numerous turkeys, and incredible geology visible from the trails. This location is perfect for mid-season when the snow on other, more popular trail systems, has been packed down. This location won’t always have snow, but when it does, it’s bound to be gorgeous!

Directions to Walkinng Mountains Science Center